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There is no such thing as a non-GMO peanut

  • joram 

Oh no, GMO! Did you know that your GMO-free peanuts are far from being free from transgenes? Also they’re full of chemicals, most of which are taken up by the body and used in the human metabolism. Beware the mighty peanut!… Read more

Global climate strike 2019

You might have noticed it on the news, or maybe you even joined – this year there was a Global Climate Strike on September 20th. We joined our local demonstration in Berlin… Read more

Don’t be a swan

  • joram 

Animal monogamy is overrated, especially in swans. Swans have worms are always angry. Don’t be a swan. Be an Arabidopsis. (we were both sleep deprived by the time we recorded this episode, so i guess you do the same to adjust to our mindset)… Read more

How the Leaf got its Shape

Leaves begin their lives as a tiny rounded ‘peg’- an outgrowth of a cluster of just a few cells. Yet as they grow, they develop not only in size, but also in shape. The result: a huge and beautiful diversity of foliage structures, with differences seen from species to species, within a single plant as it ages, or in response to the surrounding environment.

So why exactly do leaves look like they do?

It all comes down to light, water, wind warmth..… Read more

Werewolf roots

This werewolf didn’t come into being like the werewolves of other stories do. There wasn’t a bite, a fever, or rapidly sprouting knuckle-hairs. There wasn’t a dark night or a full moon or the howling call of the wild.

But there were scientists. And there may have been some mutagenic substances.… Read more

High achievers in science

  • joram 

We are not only achievers in science, we are officially high achievers in science. Don’t believe us? Ask Stefanie, she’ll tell you. This week we bring you research on agrivoltaics, facts about tulips and two tired podcasters. Please enjoy.… Read more

A house that plants built

Insects, viruses, bacteria and others can hijack plant genes to turn leaves into highly specialised organs that have one main function: to serve as a home for the invader. … Read more

Pipettes and the use of pipettes in pipetting

  • joram 

We had a picnic (not during the podcast, but just before the podcast) and it was really nice. Consider having a picnic yourself, and while your picnicing, listen to this episode on repeat over your car stereo (leave the doors open for enhanced sound). This is how all Berliners spend their summer.

Tegan’s paper: Zhao, E. M., Suek, N., Wilson, M. Z., Dine, E., Pannucci, N. L., Gitai, Z., … Toettcher, J. E. (2019). Light-based control of metabolic flux through assembly of synthetic organellesNature Chemical Biology15(6), 589–597.… Read more

Promoting defence from all sides

These promoters are pretty much the genetic version of Darth Maul’s double sided light saber.

Today we’re talking about bidirectional promoters, another amazing feature invented by nature, and now ready to be used by scientists in the quest to understand and manipulate plants!… Read more